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    The goal of this project is to update a forest dynamics model originally written in Fortran 77 to a more modern and flexible version of Fortran. Ultimately, Dr. Herman Shugart (CLAS, Environmental Sciences) wants to study the impact of scenarios such as climate change on forest succession.
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    Computational MHD is widely used for astrophysics research. Athena is one of the most popular codes in this field. John Hawley (CLAS, Astronomy) used 4800 cores of Rivanna to carry out a historically high resolution run of Athena to study turbulence in accretion disks.
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    Dr. Jerome McGann’s (CLAS, English) project examines different versions of a literary work in which many strings of text have moved relatively to each other with minor internal changes. The project required a UVACSE consultant’s expertise in modifying a Java program to carry out the analysis.
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    Dr. Jeff Corwin (U.Va. Medical School) and his collaborators teamed up with UVACSE to produce high-resolution tomography of mouse neural cells. They used visualization software to explore cell structures. By taking slices of the neural cells and reconstructing a three-dimensional model, they were able to visualize what has never been seen before.
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    This problem aims to identify and describe the parameters that affect occupant injury risk in rollover crashes. For Dr. Jeff Crandall and his team to conduct and analyze this research, UVACSE needed to facilitate his access to U.Va.'s HPC cluster resources.

News

Apply Today for the 2017 Advanced Computing for Earth Sciences (A.C.E.S.) Summer Program

posted Monday, January 23, 2017, at 10:35 am

Advanced Computing for Earth Sciences (A.C.E.S.), sponsored by the University of Virginia Advanced Research Computing Services (ARCS) group, NASA, and UVA's Department of Environmental Sciences, is an exciting opportunity for students interested in computational modeling for atmospheric, ocean, clim...

ARCS Offices Moving to North Grounds Effective 1/13/17

posted Tuesday, January 10, 2017, at 12:07 pm

ARCS staff are moving out of the Albert H. Small Building, room 112 (across from Rice Hall) and into offices at 1023 Millmont St. (near Parking & Transportation Services) beginning 13 January. All phone numbers and E-dresses for ARCS staff will remain the same. 

About Us

ARCS maintains, supports, and promotes high performance computing at the University.

System Status

Jan. 3:  Maintenance day cancelled